Top 10 Things to Never Put on Your Resume

Resume infographic

Image by Bart Claeys via Flickr

 

  1. Age, date of birth, words like young, youthful. Nothing can be gained by sharing this info other than giving the hiring manager a laugh.
  2. Marital/family/partner status. Sharing this info can make the employer uncomfortable and afraid to pursue you as a candidate as that they cannot take this into consideration legally.
  3. What year you started your degree. It doesn’t matter how many years it took – just the date you finished or anticipate to finish – unless you graduated over 15 years ago – in that case remove graduation date too.
  4. Social Security number or other confidential info if not asked for. You don’t want your resume to be thought of as something that has to be shredded or an opportunity for identity theft.
  5. Current or past salary & benefits. It looks tacky, no matter what the quantity of money made was. If an employer asks for it, include it subtly in the cover letter.
  6. Pictures or physical characteristics. Unless it’s a response to a shady ad or for modeling, it shouldn’t be requested either. Studies have shown very attractive can actually hurt your chance of getting a callback.
  7. Anything negative. Your resume should be a showcase of what amazing things you’ve done, and what amazing things you can do. Especially important not to have anything negative about past companies or coworkers.
  8. Why you left your job(s). Again, if asked, put it subtly in the cover letter. This emphasizes leaving companies, not an impression you want to create.
  9. Explanations for breaks in your resume. Highlight what you did in those breaks if substantial (include relevant volunteering or education breaks perhaps) but in no way should anything about personal issues or economy be brought in. Do not indicate you were sick, caring for a sick family member or took a child leave, do not say you were laid off and couldn’t find anything for three years. You want to give a positive feeling, and an impression that work is your #1 priority at all times.
  10. Grammatical or formatting errors. I know word does a lot for you, but no one will be as impressed by collages as they are by college. Not that patchwork isn’t pretty…but you need to carefully comb your resume for errors and print it to see how it looks formatted.

The Entertaining Search Terms Used to Find http://sharon.cc

Google's homepage in 1998

Image via Wikipedia

These are for learning & entertainment purposes only, in no particular order.

 

The Most Interesting search terms that have brought people to my blog: Up for debate.

can recruitment companies see if I’m unemployed?

when is the right time to promote someone internally?

why is finding a job so easy

getting a job is so easy

 

Google-job related searches: I’m apparently not the only one who wants to work there.

getting a job at google

google recruiter description

steps of getting hired at google

10 steps to get a job in google

waiting for google recruiter to call back

my job dream is google

waiting for a call from google recruter

“google recruiter”

geting a job at google nyc

google job call back

is landing a job at google easy

getting a job at google ny

google recruiter grades

getting job with google

google jobs steps

is google a career

getting job at google

google recuiter not calling back

easy job with google

is getting a job at google easy

how easy is it to get a job at google

google career coach

getting a job at google steps

 

Career Advice:

why talented employees fail

social media and job hunting

career fairs

linkedin summary examples for non profit employees

effective career fair table

is it ok to just walk into potential employers offices and drop off my resume

how to get a career in internal control?

where to find help for the underemployed

labor relations department risks and controls

political science career outlook

degrees needed to become a graphic designer

 

Sharon:

sharon siegel career coaching

sharon taublib

sharon siegel nyc

sharon blog nyc

sharon.cc

http.sharon.cc

career coaching blog wordpress

career counselor recruiter nyc

sharon’s career coaching (.cc)

sharoncc

“sharon.cc”

sharonsjobs.wordpress.com city

career consultants nyc

Other Career Coaches:

robo recruiter

lion cub job search

lavie margolin

effectiveness of career coaching + leave a comment

sharon strong recruit

dont like career coaching

:a look behind the curtain: the recruitment process

sample high school career coach resume

coaching for nyc public admin

talent coaching and development system for web designer

hris figure

Stupid Resumes:

it’s your resume, stupid!

stupid resumes

stupid resume’s

resumes are stupid

stupid wordpress resume

resume cliches

Resumes & Etiquette:

fabulous resumes

fun resume design

presentations improve student career

resume etiquette 2010

resume footers

resume wordpress

resume that looks like wordpress

resume tips

fabulous marketing resumes

What to put on resumes:

buzz words in footer of resume

should i put keywords at the bottom of my resume

“personal info on resume”

social media icons on resume

fitting content on a resume

resume design top

ways to design your resume

top 5 resume tips

what’s a resume footer?

resume with footer

resume tips footer

resume footer example

Cover Letters:

cover letter

curriculum vitae – creative ideas

job cover letter: and I wish you a happy new year in advance.

cover letter for managerial job

cover letter for internship as an auditor

cover letter for student

Harvard: Potential students are obviously doing their homework!

harvard kennedy school interview

resume harvard kennedy school

harvard kennedy school

harvard kennedy school tips

harvard resume kennedy school

ksg school harvard interview admissions

resumes kennedy school

what person harvard kennedy school is looking for

harvard kennedy school employees

harvard kennedy school career services

harvard kennedy school interviews

harvard kennedy school waste of time

harvard kennedy school application interview

how to interview for harvard hks

interview for harvard hks

harvard kennedy school admission interview

answers harvard kennedy school interview

motivation letter harvard by jfk

preparation for harvard kennedy school interview

harvard kennedy school admissions tips

harvard kennedy school resume

harvard kennedy school qualities

applying for harvard kennedy school tips

harvard career interview tips

what job can you get out of harvard kennedy

harvard kennedy application interview

kennedy school application interview

phone interview kennedy school

NYC Civil Service:

nyc provisional employees 2010

dcas long beach decision 2010

control council law no. 10

“qualified or not”

can’t afford dcas exams

“long beach decision”, dcas, 2010

nyc provisional employees

long beach vs dcas

dcas and long beach decision

dcas “long beach decision” 2010

nyc doe provisional employee

dcas long beach

 

 

 

Web & logo design: Obviously designers are looking for ideas to copy…

personal coaching logo

web design

logos from nyc companies

technical logo

web designer

business logo design

psd logo hire company

designer logo

design logo

web designer logos

personal design logos

graphic designers personal logo

graphic designs backgrounds

graphic designer logo samples

personal logo graphic designer

round graphic design logo

innovative 2 part logos

graphic designer motivation letter

 

 

 

 

Random:

seo tips

tips for the ceo

portal project requirements

workplace snob

facebook/myspace reply to “do i know you”??

jdeal

i possess a unique set educational and professional experience that, i believe, match with those required for the position.

sources of recruitment by external sources pictures of media advertisements

educational staffing+blogs

Fail: SEO – It doesn’t work if this comes to my blog:

I’m better than you

5 Basic Reasons Your Resume Wasn’t Even Viewed

Cool Blog Sociale - 10 July 2008 - Creative hi...

Image by SOCIALisBETTER via Flickr

 

Of course as usual recruiting should be an objective science, but as that it’s humans and computer systems combined trying to figure out if they want YOU or someone BETTER than YOU to work for them, you might get knocked out of the pool quickly with these simple issues.

1. You saved your resume in a non-standard format (i.e. docx, wordpad, even occasionally pdf’s get tossed). Stick to a basic word format – you have nothing to lose.

2. You have an immature or inappropriate email address. Yes, this includes having your age or the year you were born in your email, not just sexykitten@hotmail.com – when you’re TimSmith88@yahoo.com, We know you’re 22ish, and probably don’t really have the 10 years of experience on your resume.

3. Your name. I would personally never discriminate, but I heard this from a coworker who did a large study in her masters program: 2 applications were put in for the same job, one with an ethnic name, one with a ‘white sounding’ name. The applications with the ethnic names were disqualified first.

Now I’m not saying to change your name, but if you have a more American sounding nickname or middle name, it might be worth trying to see if you get a better response. Just correct them at your interview, unless you always want to be known by this “American” name.

4. You applied to every job the company had posted on the website. Some job sites have spam guards that will think you’re a bot spamming them (when in reality you’re a human spamming them – because applying to every job IS spamming) and will delete your application.

Stick to only applying for jobs you’re qualified for and really want. There’s no way you want to be an engineer, custodian, hairdresser and an IT person – so don’t apply for them all.

5. Your cover letter is lousy, looks like it was written by someone else, or could have been written by anyone. It had spelling/grammar mistakes, or perhaps the company or recruiter’s name misspelled; it had clichés like ‘My skills and experience would be an asset to your organization’. If someone can’t take the time to cut and paste in the company name and title of where they’re applying for, then perhaps another ‘organization’ who doesn’t mind laziness will hire you!

12 Steps to a Career You Deserve


Hi my name is Sharon and I’m in a dead-end career/unemployed/underemployed….
All in unison: Hi Sharon.

Remember that you’re still the seller and that etiquette, manners, and patience will bring you much closer to your career goals than bitterness, laziness or rudeness.

1. Figure out what you’re actually qualified to do that you’d potentially enjoy, and reach within your bounds, overshooting them will be a wasted effort and give burn-out

2. Decide what type of position would suit you ideally, p/t, f/t, consulting, internship, etc.

3. Create a consistent, professional brand and profile for yourself: resumes & cover letters for various industries/target audiences, business cards, online web presence, thank you letters, elevator pitch, etc.

4. Apply to advertised jobs with targeted cover letters – I’ve seen many resumes thrown out because the objective or cover letter is targeted to a different job – make it crystal clear why you want THIS job, and why you’re qualified for THIS job, but feel free to mention what else you’d consider or to keep things broad

5. Send your resume to places you want to work, explaining why you want to work there & what positions you’d like, even if they don’t have advertised positions

6. Network with people in the industry you want to be in

7. General networking: make sure everyone you know or meet knows what you’re looking for and why

8. Follow up with sincere, personally written thank you notes to everyone who does anything for you in the process from introductions to interviews – but NEVER give a deadline or imply one, i.e., “I hope to hear from you regarding your decision by September 1” – it’s in poor taste, and perhaps it takes a month for the company to come to a decision – do you want the company to think you’re not longer interested because they couldn’t accommodate you?

9. Present your very best: have an excellent dark suit, pressed collared shirts, and classic bags/shoes/accessories/portfolios to present at interviews. Have something a little more daring for networking events to look professional but stand out of the crowd.

10. Confidence works: Interview and network like you’re everyone’s favorite person, try to figure out culture of others and tailor all responses and actions to where you are – when in Rome, do as the Romans

11. Realize that different strokes work for different folks: just because a technique landed your last job, don’t expect it to automatically work again

12. Negotiate offer, unless it’s clearly set in stone. Never expect to get more than you’ve asked for previously, and don’t expect much more than a job was advertised or offered at. Most companies figure nowasdays that they can find someone to do the job at the salary they want to pay, and they’re OK if that person isn’t you – but generally it doesn’t hurt to ask if a little more is available due to your extraordianary skills, value and talents you bring to the company. Reinstate why you want this role, why you want to work for the company, but is there any room for flexibility?

It can’t hurt – if a place rescinds your offer because you asked to negotiate you probably don’t want to work there anyway…that’s not nice!

Short link: http://wp.me/pWfpN-61

I Beg to Differ

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As they say with opinions, everybody has one…

I just came across this recommended cover letter, and this reminded me that everyone is entitled to their own opinion. If I were this candidate, I’d say include nothing but paragraph 2 – unless you have a connection or introduction to the company. If they’ve already heard about you, I think it’s safe to say a bit more about your story. If you’re a stranger and submit a 500+ word cover letter, it’ll look generic (what’s generic professionally you ask? http://wp.me/pWfpN-q) and will probably not get read. It’d be skipped entirely likely, and then defeats its purpose of being your great marketing tool & first impression.

So if you have an intro to the company, then maybe throw in 3 bullets max about your value/accomplishments, and then sign off with your thanks & contact info (even if it’s in the resume, you want to make it ridiculously easy for them to get in touch with you).

Do also include in your cover letter other relevant info, i.e. if you’re applying to a position that requires relocation, outline your enthusiasm for moving to their location & that you’d be available to do so within one month of receiving an offer (or sooner!). Or if the position requests a salary history, I recommend putting your most recent salary in the cover (unless you’re in a step down position due to economic need, then you might want to skirt the issue). I hate seeing dollar amounts in resumes, I think it looks greedy (see tip #2 http://wp.me/pWfpN-1P).

I believe a cover letter should be a short introduction to who you are, what you can do that will benefit the company you’re applying to, and not much else. It is not a speech – you should not be ‘saying what you’re going to say, saying it, and then saying what you said’.

Just say it, and then prove it with your resume. Oh, and then use all your swagger and hustle to impress them at the interview. Then write the most sincere, politely thank you note you can muster with ZERO sense of pathetic desperation and minimal sucking up.  Then graciously thank them for their generous offer, but ask gently, is this open to negotiation? (More on negotiating an offer here & more to come another time: http://wp.me/pWfpN-x).

And don’t forget, have fun. Recruiters, HR people, and hiring managers are reading a LOT of resumes and cover letters. Don’t be afraid to use a drop of subtle humor to keep yourself and whoever may be reading your resume entertained. Yes stay professional, but that’s not the same as dull. Unless you’re an accountant. In that case rock on with your dull self.

Functional Resume = Shady Resume

A lot of people do functional resumes nowadays, but I only recommend that if you’re hiding major issues or time gaps.

Resumes should be brief & informative, bulleted, clean style.

Use narrow margins to get the most on a page.  For really senior people a 2nd page might be necessary, but chances are no one is reading it. If they have a masters or higher, or went to an excellent school, put education before experience. If it’s a BA or lower, then keep it at the bottom (unless from Harvard etc.).

If you graduated more than 15 years ago, or less than 2, I don’t recommend putting a year on the degree. If you have any college or advanced degree remove high school (again unless it was Stuyvesant etc.).

Shortlink to this post: http://wp.me/pWfpN-8